Common symptoms of drug detox

A benzodiazepine chemically similar to prescription sedatives such as Valium® and Xanax® that may be misused for its psychotropic effects. Rohypnol has been used to commit sexual assaults because of its strong sedation effects. In these cases, offenders may dissolve the drug in a person’s drink without their knowledge.



Man-made substances used to treat conditions caused by low levels of steroid hormones in the body and misused to enhance athletic and sexual performance and physical appearance. For more information, see the Steroids and Other Appearance and Performance Enhancing Drugs (APEDs) Research Report.


For more information on alcohol’s effects on the body, please see the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism’s (NIAAA’s) related web page describing alcohol’s effects on the body. NIAAA also has some information about mixing alcohol with certain medicines.

Drug Detox: Types, Signs, Symptoms Of Detoxification

A hallucinogen manufactured from lysergic acid, which is found in ergot, a fungus that grows on rye and other grains. LSD is an abbreviation of the scientific name l ysergic acid diethylamide . For more information, see the Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs Research Report.

A hallucinogen in certain types of mushrooms that grow in parts of South America, Mexico, and the United States. For more information, see the Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs Research Report.

Signs Of Drug Addiction Withdrawals That Are Easy To

Common Names Commercial Names Common Forms Common Ways Taken DEA Schedule Herbal Speedball, Biak-biak, Ketum, Kahuam, Thang, Thom None Fresh or dried leaves, powder, liquid, gum Chewed (whole leaves); eaten (mixed in food or brewed as tea); occasionally smoked Not scheduled Possible Health Effects Short-term Nausea, dizziness, itching, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, increased urination, loss of appetite. Low doses: increased energy, sociability, alertness. High doses: sedation, euphoria, decreased pain. Long-term Anorexia, weight loss, insomnia, skin darkening, dry mouth, frequent urination, constipation. Hallucinations with long-term use at high doses in some users. Other Health-related Issues Unknown. In Combination with Alcohol Unknown. Withdrawal Symptoms Muscle aches, insomnia, hostility, aggression, emotional changes, runny nose, jerky movements. Treatment Options Medications No clinical trials have been conducted on medications for kratom addiction. Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to kratom.




Common Names Commercial Names Common Forms Common Ways Taken DEA Schedule Gear, Gym Candy, Juice, Pumpers, Roids, Stacking Nandrolone ( Oxandrin ® ) , oxandrolone ( Anadrol ® ), oxymetholone ( Anadrol-50 ® ), testosterone cypionate ( Depo-testosterone ® ) Tablet, capsule, liquid drops, gel, cream, patch, injectable solution Injected, swallowed, applied to skin III** Possible Health Effects Short-term Builds muscles, improved athletic performance. Acne, fluid retention (especially in the hands and feet), oily skin, yellowing of the skin, infection. Long-term Kidney damage or failure; liver damage; high blood pressure, enlarged heart, or changes in cholesterol leading to increased risk of stroke or heart attack, even in young people; aggression; extreme mood swings; anger ("roid rage"); extreme irritability; delusions; impaired judgment. Other Health-related Issues Males: shrunken testicles, lowered sperm count, infertility, baldness, development of breasts.


Common Names Commercial Names Common Forms Common Ways Taken DEA Schedule Acid, Blotter, Boomers, Cid, Golden Dragon, Looney Tunes, Lucy Mae, Microdots, Tabs, Yellow Sunshine No commercial uses Tablet; capsule; clear liquid; small, decorated squares of absorbent paper that liquid has been added to Swallowed, absorbed through mouth tissues (paper squares) I** Possible Health Effects Short-term Rapid emotional swings; distortion of a person’s ability to recognize reality, think rationally, or communicate with others; raised blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature; dizziness; loss of appetite; tremors; enlarged pupils. Long-term Frightening flashbacks (called Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder [HPPD]); ongoing visual disturbances, disorganized thinking, paranoia, and mood swings. Other Health-related Issues Unknown. In Combination with Alcohol Unknown. Withdrawal Symptoms Unknown. Treatment Options Medications There are no FDA-approved medications to treat addiction to LSD or other hallucinogens. Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to hallucinogens.