Weight loss patches: Do they work? - Medical News Today

Skin patches (also called transdermal patches) aren’t new. They’ve long been used to treat a range of health conditions. However, there are a few reasons to be skeptical of weight loss patches:



4. Zycie Nutrition Slimming Patch.


Doctors recommend following a low calorie diet to aid weight loss. The number of calories that a person should consume every day depends on several factors, including their baseline weight, gender, age, and activity level. A doctor or nutritionist can help a person calculate the best total daily calorie intake and macronutrient breakdown for them.

There’s *always* a new weight loss fad getting buzz. Whether it's waist trainers or a new detox tea, there's simply something seductive and appealing about a quick fix that will help you reach your weight loss goals as fast as possible. But, spoiler, most of the time these products are total B.S. And that's no different when it comes to the latest fad item: weight loss patches, like with Japanese mint or green tea extract.

Green coffee bean extract also contains caffeine, which, research has shown, may help with weight loss. So, sounds kinda promising?

Best Slimming Patch for Weight Loss: How to Lose Belly Fat

Many other weight loss products and patches are available on the market, but people should speak with a doctor before using any product to help them lose weight. Doctors can recommend methods for losing weight that clinical trials have demonstrated to be effective and safe.




Not all areas of the skin offer the same absorption rates, as the characteristics of the skin’s surface affect its ability to absorb. Humidity and heat are additional factors that can affect the absorption across the skin.


Ephedra: Also commonly referred to as ephedrine, this ingredient has a reputation for being straight-up dangerous, and rightfully so. In fact, in 2004, ephedra was banned by the FDA for use in diet and sports supplements because it showed to have serious health risks like heart attack and stroke, resulting in deaths. Physicians generally agree that it’s not a safe or effective treatment for weight loss, and for that reason alone, steer clear.